Friday, February 26, 1993

THROUGH THE LAPIS SKY


THROUGH THE LAPIS SKY

Through the lapis sky
the sound of ducks crossing
the rays of the sun
beyond my vision lies the sphinx
of hope that moves
across the sky each night
before I arise each morning
I look for the glue in the air
and out my window comes
the exuberance of dawn

2/26/93

AMONG THE TREES


AMONG THE TREES

among the trees
another song of blackbirds
whispering in the classroom

the children invent new lives
and the birds are jealous
among the trees

the window reflects the pond
the invisible air is jealous
of the whispering in the classroom

I look to the order of the sky
to find my way home to the end of  a sentence
among the trees
whispering in the classroom

2/26/93  CPITS writing in class, first draft

Monday, February 22, 1993

PLASTER BANDAGE MASK WORKSHOP for kids


PLASTER BANDAGE MASKS        

Dear Parents and Kids:

We’re making plaster bandage masks on Mon. Feb. 22. If you’d like to assist your child to make a mask, you’re welcome to join us.

We use cold cream or Vaseline to protect each child’s face from the plaster (it’s like getting a facial!) But each child will need to bring something to hold the hair off the face—such as a hair band, a stretchy tube sock cut into bands, the neck of a tee shirt, hair clips, a cap, or even a plastic bag!

It’s a good idea to wear a large old tee-shirt as a smock, as it’s a messy project. Also bring a soft wash cloth to wash those GREASY faces after the mask comes off. Allergies are rare—but please let us know if you have any concerns.

We begin the workshop with the beginning: creation stories, the first masks, masks of various cultures, the importance of masks—and we’ll explore other options, developing personal themes for the decoration of our masks.

  • Masks to help things—masks to heal the environment, masks to make corn grow, masks to facilitate understanding between peoples.
  • Masks to stop things—the destruction of the rainforest, to stop Fido from chewing up the homework mask, masks to stop nightmares.
  • Masks of origin: totem animal and ancestor masks, futuristic masks, fantasy masks.

HOMEWORK IDEAS: Make a collage mask using magazine photos, find mask shapes hidden in in ordinary everyday objects—cars, bottles, etc.)

We will need lots of interesting goodies to adorn the masks. Think of texture, shininess, color, symbolism, patterns, designs and shapes as you search for small objects that are personal, or that you love, but make sure it’s OK to take them first! Let your imagination run on a wild raid through the junk drawers and boxes—these places contain some fascinating bits of family history.  Also bring things to share with the class—we’ll have a potlatch. 

Some suggestions include: feathers, leather scraps, fur, interesting material, old wrapping paper,  shells, shell bits, small pebbles, bottle caps, buttons, corks, yarns, sequins, beads—big & small, Spanish (mushdash) moss, raffia, tinsel, Easter hay, lace, ribbon (for hair and presents), pipe cleaners, bells, interesting (homemade?) paper, cardboard, heavy paper, shiny foils and decorative papers, bones, pine cones, acorns, bits of costume jewelry, small toys or pieces of toys, dead watches, keys, neat material. . .  

If you have felt, bring it to line the inside of the mask. And some elastic to tie it to your head. 
AND thanks for helping us out!

Friday, February 12, 1993

PLASTER-BANDAGE MASK WORKSHOP for Adults

PLASTER-BANDAGE MASKS

Learn how to make plaster masks at the AC poetry retreat on Fri. Feb. 12, and Sat. aft., Feb. 13 at Silverpenny Farm. We will use plaster bandages to transform our faces and our art.

Some ideas: make masks to help things—to heal the environment, to make corn (or money) grow, to facilitate understanding between peoples.
Masks to stop things—the destruction of the rainforest, to stop Fido from chewing up the AC contracts and paperwork, to stop nightmares.
Masks of origin: totem animal and ancestor masks, futuristic masks, fantasy masks.

We’ll explore options, developing personal themes for the decoration of our masks.

HOMEWORK IDEAS: Make a collage mask using magazine photos, find mask shapes hidden in ordinary everyday objects—cars, bottles, etc.)

We will need lots of interesting goodies to adorn the masks.
Think of texture, shininess, color, symbolism, patterns, designs and shapes as you search for small objects that are personal, or that you love. Let your imagination run wild through the junk drawers and boxes—these places contain some fascinating bits of family history. Also bring things to share with the class—we’ll have a potlatch.

THINGS TO BRING:
  • Thick greasy cold cream or Vaseline to protect your face from plaster (like getting a facial!).
  • Something to hold the hair off the face—a hair band, a stretchy tube sock cut into bands, the neck of a tee shirt, hair clips, bobby pins, a cap, or a plastic bag. Beards need Saran Wrap.
  • A soft wash cloth to wash those GREASY faces after the mask comes off. Tools: scissors, paint brushes, acrylic, or specialty paints, fabric paints, (we'll provide poster paints) glue, hot glue gun, glitter, etc.
  • Ornaments: feathers, fur, interesting material, leather scraps, interesting (homemade?) paper, pretend money, cardboard, shiny foils and decorative papers, shells, small pebbles, bottle caps, buttons, sequins, beads, dried flowers & weeds, Spanish moss, raffia, tinsel, lace, ribbon, yarn, pipe cleaners, bells, bones, pine cones, acorns, bits of costume jewelry, small pieces of toys, dead watches, keys. . If you have felt, bring it to line the inside of the mask. And some elastic to tie it to your head. Since plaster bandages for masks is very expensive, a $5 donation toward supplies would be welcome.
We'll need:
  • Demo masks—bring some of your Chinese and Latin American masks; I'll bring plaster demos. 
  • Poster paint: red, yellow, blue plus turquoise, magenta, black & white, gesso, clear sealant. Big flat 1/2" wide poster paint brushes, and small round watercolor brushes. 6 to 12 egg cartons to mix paints, and large containers to rinse brushes, paper towels, newspaper.
  • Surgical bandages 4" rolls; each roll makes 2-3 masks—depending upon face size. 
  • Vaseline. Lots of scissors to cut bandages; I have a pattern to u se.
  • Interesting j junk to add onto masks Hot glue guns and tacky glue (&/or Elmer's Glue—it makes a good clear glaze too). Elastic and paper ring hole reinforcers for the holes, felt to line the masks.