Wednesday, March 4, 1987

Dictionary of the Imagination poems


from a Luis Kong workshop,
using Jorge Lujan's Dictionary of the imagination

River—a mirror that runs and sings
Stars—holes in a dark tarp
Rainbow—a wet, iridescent trail of a comet used by prospectors searching for gold
River—a fish highway from the mountains to the stars
Does every river run to the sea?
indigo ink spilled
a blue trail for fish
to find the ocean
Moon—silver money sobbing in the pockets (Lorca)
a period  where the sky ends
Sea— blue river tongues licking at the feet of tropical islands
Cemetery—a plot where dead people live
Mountains—teeth piercing the clouds
hungry mouths feeding the sky
eating the weather
mouths voraciously feeding upon the clouds
Solar wind—huge bellows sucking and blowing on cosmic fires
Sun—the ouroboros eye of the dragon
a giant yellow ball lost in space
a feathered chariot pulling the eye of the dragon
ouroboros across the blue mantle of space
Rain—a cloud bursting into tears
blood from wounded clouds
Fish—small silver coins flashing in open sea banks
Snow—frozen white thoughts leaking from wounded clouds
Bluejay‚blue water flying in the wind
thief of catfood
Earth—a big blue ball in space
a bulging suitcase of extinct species

Use six definitions in a poem. It doesn't have to make sense. Don't use the original noun.


Huge bellows push the chariot
carrying the eye of the dragon
across the mantle of space.
frozen white thoughts
leak from wounded clouds
to fall into agape beaks 
feeding on the sky
a wet iridescent trail of a comet
used by prospectors in search of gold
and the small silver coins shining
open the sea banks to vaults in tropical islands.


take 2:
The feathered chariot 
that carries the eye of the dragon 
across the sky is blown off course 
by huge bellows held by giants 
hidden under the mantle of space 
but there are holes in the tarp
the frozen white thoughts of clouds 
leak into agape beaks feeding in the sky
it leaves a wet, iridescent trail 
used by comets and prospectors 
in search of gold and small silver coins 
hidden in sea banks where blue tongues 
lick at the feet of tropical islands.

Take 3:

Who is instructing the giants 
holding huge bellows 
that blow the feathered chariot 
carrying the eye of the dragon 
across the mantle of space?
but there are holes in the tarp
the frozen white thoughts of clouds
leap into agape mountain beaks
feeding on the sky
When we forget the names of the sun
it leaves a wet, iridescent trail
of flies and oranges under a full moon.

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