Saturday, July 11, 2015

The Pillars of Creation


The composite photo of the Pillars, taken on April 1st, 1995, was composed of 32 images from four cameras, and the update (with a new wide field camera) is a tribute to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Hubble launch. Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)/J. Hester, P. Scowen (Arizona State U.) —Discover

When we view images of stars, galaxies and space clouds, we're seeing images of THEN. Not NOW. Past tense, as in from the backabeyond of time. In this case, 6-7000 light years ago, what we view now as the serenely beautiful columns of interstellar gas and dust, dubbed The Pillars of Creation, within the Eagle Nebula, existed then. But not now. We don't know what they look like now. It's a time-space continuum thing.

When we see photos of distant galaxies and star clusters, we're looking back into time. Literally. We only know what they looked like then.

Solar winds and exploding light waves of young hoodlum stars in the Eagle Nebula have crashed into hydrogen clouds that comprise The Pillars of Creation, some 6000 light years ago, and continue to do so. A star tantrum, a supernova explosion, disrupted the pillars in the blink of an eye, long ago. And we're just now getting the news.

The refracted light of myriad star nursery collisions some 6000 light years ago will reach us in about a thousand earth years hence. In this way, we see everything in the past tense. Only our brains are in the present tense of right now. What we see in theses photos right now may no longer exist. No longer exists. Existed.

The tallest pillar of The Pillars of Creation was—and I do mean was—four light years long, give or take a few miles. And we're just now seeing how it looked eons ago, in time present. We can't fathom what it looks like now. Even though we are looking at the latest updated Hubble images. Talk about time warp.

The original Pillars of Creation photo was taken April 1, 1995. Apparently the joke's on us.  And what about all those old Jackie Gleason TV shows that are headed toward the Andromeda Galaxy? Have they reached it yet? And what about Star Trek, for that matter? Happy 25th anniversary Hubble Telescope. You've boldly gone...

You can see the Pillars in the lower left quadrant of The Eagle Nebula —Wiki
I think the NASA image is so big, it broke Blogger, try again.
From Wiki



To read more about the Pillars, see Discover Magazine's
The “Pillars of Creation” Have Been, Are Being, and Will Be Destroyed

The Pillars of Creation  Wiki

The Eagle Nebula M16, aka The Star Queen Nebula. Some incredible photos at the bottom of the page.

light-years

How far is a light-year?  Light, the fastest-moving stuff in the universe, travels 300,000 kilometers (186,000 miles) per second. So, in a year, light travels about 6-trillion miles. The Andromeda Galaxy is over 2-million light years from earth.


First draft

When you view images of the stars, galaxies and clouds, you're looking at images of THEN. Not NOW. Past time. In this case, 6-7000 years ago, the Pillars of Creation existed. But not now. We're looking back into time. Literally. Solar winds and light waves from young hoodlum stars from the Eagle Nebula have crashed into the Pillars. The light from the crash will reach us in about a thousand years. We see everything in the past tense. Only our brains are in the now. What we see in theses photos now may no longer exist.
The tallest pillar was four light years long, give or take a few light years. I fell in love with the 1995 Hubble image, and the photo below, is a 2014 update

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