Saturday, November 2, 2013

LOST ART


Today's headlines: Trove of Looted Nazi Art Found in a Berlin Flat.

The people of Leningrad mourned for the art was lost during Nazi occupation. Many pieces from the Hermitage were never recovered. The people of Leningrad attempted to hide one million pieces of art—they hid paintings by taking them off their frames, rolling them up, and storing them in sheds, barns, and caves with the cows. They buried pots and gold coins underground. For that, they were starved during the siege. The cattle killed. But they would not give up the art to the Nazis and they mourned for what was lost. Communal gardens began sprouting rare china, then bones, and a harvest of teeth. Like the Bibi Yar. Russians still make up stories of the fabled lost amber room of Catherine the Great. Perhaps someday we'll find other Nazi caches in Swiss vaults, German apartments, and Argentinian haciendas. My fear is that when this art is repatriatied to the heirs of the original owners, it'll disappear back into vaulted caves. But the work of Chagall Picasso and Matisse belongs to the daylighted world. Not the past. 



11/4/2013
rev 11/5






Flashnano Day 2: Write a story that incorporates a piece of scientific/analytic data

Write a “news of the day” poem. The poem shou
ld use some sort of recent news event as a springboard. It can be a news story from today (this morning), but it doesn’t have to be. In fact, you could even go “old school” and find news stories from archived sources–like the “news of the day” from 1936 (to pick a random year).

When I was in the USSR, I was told that there were still many lost Nazi art caches. This is one of them found. Many pieces from the Hermitage were never recovered. The people of Leningrad attempted to hide one million pieces of art—they hid paintings by taking them off their frames, rolling them up, and storing them in sheds, barns, and caves. Buried pots and gold underground. For that, they were starved during the siege. But they would not give up the art and they still mourn for what was lost. People still make up stories of the survival of the fabled amber room of Catherine the Great. And so many other artifacts that belong to the world (not just the Hermitage) were lost. Perhaps someday we'll find other Nazi caches in Swiss vaults and German apartments and Argentinian haciendas.

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