Sunday, December 31, 2006

ART & SCIENCE: Color Mixing teaching notes



ART & SCIENCE                                                                  
Introduction to Color Cycles             
Using TEMPERA PAINTS with Young Students       
   
This is a sample overview. Students should have a minimum of 5 sessions to be comfortable with painting. Day One: making geometric/organic shapes, using only two colors to see how many hues and tones you can get. Day Two: using three colors create overlapping layers (landscapes)l Day Three: a follow up on landscapes. Day Four could be partner painting using really big paper (18 x 22”). Day Five: portfolio & closure.

OBJECTIVE: To incorporate science and art. Choose a theme from the science standards: the elements (air, earth, fire, water), an environment (land, sea, sky), cycles (weather, day/night, seasons, etc.) Prepare by studying science lesson/ concept you wish to enhance with art. Create art using thumbnail drawings, tempera paints, and afterwards, have a complimenting session. Then brainstorm to show what concepts students have learned. This project spans about 2-3 one+ hour sessions.

PRE-PLANNING:: DAY TWO: Each student will create thumbnail drawings: For each student have white paper, pencil, or water-base black felt tip pens; and items to draw. They could be from magazine & calendar pictures of animals, plants, ecosystems, landscapes, etc. 

I like to begin DAY ONE & TWO with landscapes composed of layers or organic triangles. I demonstrate nature’s dendritic triangles with calendar photos of landscapes: we count layers and look for triangles. Have students individually come up with drawing/painting ideas, using contour or solid (not sketchy) line (this could develop into another lesson on biological illustration).

MATERIALS:
·     Each student should have a piece of 12 x 18 inches, 80 lb. white Sulfite paper. ,Unlike most drawing paper, .it can withstand the stress of heavy-handed painting. I never let a student throw away paper when they say they made a mistake. I always emphasize that  there are no mistakes in art. I tell them to transform a mistake and turn it into art. I’ve even washed the paper and had them began again. They’re usually surprised at how good it comes out.

·     Large ice cube trays with the 3 primary colors (actually I use 4:colors: yellow, magenta, cyan sky blue AND ultramarine blue). Jaz or Sargeant temperas are best brands to use. Two students can share a paint set. This way they can also keep tabs on each other to NOT pollute the paint. Color mixing happens ONLY on the paper. Start light (yellow), and work toward dark colors. You can’t undo dark colors but you can darken light colors.

·      Stiff poster paint brushes 1/2 inch to 1 inch wide. Dollar Store is your best source. I also keep on hand, small round stiff brushes for details. Our brushes don’t live in the water containers (too many accidents) they snooze on the damp sponges which are better than paper towels for taking excess water off brushes. The paper, water, sponges and brushes are set up like a Japanese dinner setting. A tray is also useful to distribute supplies.

·     Cello sponges cut in half to rest brushes upon can to be used to take excess water off brushes, and used for clean up at the end. That way,, we don’t use paper towels at all.

·     Water containers. I use pint yogurt containers for each student. I keep extras to change dirty water.. Small buckets for storing sponges, brushes, and for water changing. I change their dirty paint water early and often. I think of this part as art catering.

When it comes to desks, I’m a minimalist. I don’t cover the desks with newspaper. They’re usually made of Formica and tempera paint wipes right up. Cleanup is a snap; Student are responsible for clean up. Just like the care and feeding of art supplies, I tell them that clean up is part of the art process.

Two students can share a water container, (but it’s better if each has their own) and an ice tray arranged with 3 primary (printer) colors, Cyan (sky blue/turquoise), Magenta (red hot pink), and Yellow. (For watercolor on paper, I use Crayola 07-W mixing paint sets to get the right shade of magenta & turquoise. I often remove the black and the orange paints. There’s no green.).

ART SCIENCE VOCABULARY: Layers, overlapping, composition, balance, contour line, wet-on-wet, texture, osmosis, color-mixing, brush strokes, wash, etc. Add to this list! Create a science list of terms.

Utilize the Visual Arts Framework  components: Artistic Perception (planning), Creative Expression (hands-on), Historical and Culture context (models), & Aesthetic Valuing (sharing) with the

Science Framework vocabulary: Observe. Ask questions.  Make a Hypothesis. Experiment. Make a Conclusion. Share what you’ve learned. What surprised you? etc. Artists and scientist use many similar skill sets: observation and hypothesis are key components.

PROCEDURE:

1.            Have students draw ideas on white paper (I use copy paper folded into a squares.) I do a lot of pre-drawing warm-up exercises using a solid contour line which we’ll also practice in class. Black felt tip pens also discourage sketchy lines. I prefer Eberhardt-Faber water base pens.

2.            Using calendar photos and pictures for reference, students can also draw detailed individual things, objects, landscapes.

3.            Paint in all yellow and light green areas first. Start light and work to dark colors. You can’t lighten paint. This is a good place to use scientific inquiry to demonstrate color mixing. I often ask students to observe their paint trays and I ask them to tell me what colors are missing. I write the three primary colors on the board as equations.

·            Yellow + cyan = green.
·            Blue + magenta = purple.
·            Yellow = magenta = orange or red (really).

I ask them to Observe. Question. What happens if  you paint blue on top of yellow?
Make a hypothesis. Experiment. Conclusion. You get green. (This makes for a great quiz later on.)

Using more water with the paint gives you pastel hues. More paint equals solid or opaque colors.

If you don’t want to limit their palettes, you can introduce pre-mixed green and red, etc. I don’t use black. (Secondary colors mixed together make mud, brown/black.) A limited palette makes for a more brilliant piece. If someone discovers how to make brown, gray, or black, we usually make a fanfare, and ask them how they did it Give them a chance to share, be the expert.

4.            I demonstrate color mixing on a piece of paper taped to the board. I also
explain that it’s very important to carefully rinse the brush after using each color.  I demonstrate how to use the sponge to absorb excess water.

I demonstrate how to dip only  the tip of the brush into the top layer of the paint. Don’t gouge or dig paint out from the bottom of the tray. It’s wasteful and usually pollutes the paint.. All the action happens in the tip of the brush, not where the metal joins the bristles. No paint on the metal flange! 

I demonstrate how to use a brush, to stroke gently, as if you were petting a soft rabbit. No twirling the brush like a drill or scrubbing the wrong direction. Not like petting the cat backwards. If your paper gets hairballs, you’re scrubbing too hard. It’s literally dissolving. Teachers, don’t be afraid to get right in there and paint your own masterpiece. Kids love to see teachers modeling art, taking risks, just like them.

5.            We paint for about a half an hour. Sometimes it’s only for 20 minutes. I circulate
and exclaim and coo over the cool colors they’ve invented, I ask them how they got a particular color and to give an unusual color a special name. (Note Bene: the human eye can see 2 to 5 million colors, hues and tones.) I also comment on their shapes and composition, Sometimes I’ll say, “I really love this section. Don’t do anything more there. Leave it as it is It’s utterly beautiful the way the red…”.and I give an example why I like it, I’m also giving them language for later when we compliment each other’s work 

About half way through the lesson, we check to see if the paints are polluted. I show them how to carefully lift polluting paint off the top with a brush. I remind them to leave no white areas on their paper. All areas need paint on them, except maybe teentsy areas of white are OK. Don’t leave a white area for their name. I use a stabillo pencil to write their names directly on top of the wet paint on the bottom of the page. Stabillo pencils love wet paint to write on.

6.            Clean up. I usually assign a few students to collect brushes, to  put the brushes in a bucket and wash them all at once, not individually. Students can squeeze excess water out of their sponges into their water containers and use sponge to clean their desks. That way I keep sink traffic to a minimum. Dirty sponges go into another bucket to wash later. 

Palettes are inspected and cleaned with a sponge if the yellow is polluted. Otherwise, I just leave paint in the tray for the next session. Wrap them in a cleaning bag or plastic wrap and they’ll keep fresh for weeks. If you get the large matching ice cube trays, they’ll stack nicely and make a seal, and will keep paint wet for a long time. If paint dries out, I reconstitute it with a little fresh diluted paint on top. Let it sit about a day to reconstitute. I also generally thin the paints in the bottle as it’s too thick.

7.            Peer complimenting/aesthetic valuing session. I lay out  a large block of finished paintings on the floor. We gather around all the beautiful art. I model a compliment with, “I like they way this part has colors that blend...” etc. Then that student will say, “Thank you.” And choose a painting they like and give it a compliment: “I like the way this person …” and that student will say, “Thank you.” And so on in a daisy chain until everybody has had a turn. 

Try to limit their compliment to under a minute each or they’ll all get restless. I ask the student whose art is about to be complimented to be ready to choose some art as soon as their compliment is finished.

Look in the Visual & Performing Arts Framework for other ideas and vocabulary. Don’t forget to display the art on a hall wall so other students can admire their work. Kids naturally like to look at peer art.

Sample work Landscapes (tempera, art)
Klee Quilts (art) tempera

This lesson, developed from a Young Audiences format (see below) was for an arts workshop
Arts Council of Sonoma County ARTS Education Alliance
ARTS Integration: Bringing Creativity to the Classroom  April 1, 2006
Arts Education Alliance ARTS Integration

Drawings of students late 1990s mid-2000s
























Three drawings, Scotland, ca 2006

Loch Tunnel
 
Loch reflection
Argyle Butte

I have no idea when these drawings were done, they were from old calendar photos, I've a vague memory of drawing them after I had returned from Scotland. But I could've drawn them much earlier. The scan date is 6/2006. I was teaching at Cleveland Elementary School in Oakland, and had to come up with lot of drawing ideas. This morphed into a pastel, and a painting exercise based on layers.

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

FLIP A COIN


Well, it’s come to that
flip a coin when stasis sets in.
John the Ambiguous
was always one for a coin toss.
Have a kid, break up, get married, break up.
Whatever flummoxed him
was reduced to a 50/50 chance
so he didn't have to decide.
A good thing coins aren’t dice cubes.
It would increase the odds.
Otherwise we’d all be snake eyes.

10/17/06

Sunday, October 15, 2006

PERSONA WORKSHOP MARGINALIA

PERSONA WORKSHOP
MARGINALIA After Jarrell

I had started to walk down the path
These are the roads you find yourself traveling
Homesick for anything, she asked me in her windswept voice
Occasions for the grief that left me seething at the sea
She heard a lot of it when she came home from the hospital
Help me! The pain in her bones paralyzed me
So I wrote these words in the margins

GENERATIVE WRITING

GENERATIVE WRITING
From Thoreau, TC Boyle. Oates, Wright, Merrill, etc.

We were observing
Replacing the old style cells
In which a window
Measuring 6 x 8 feet
More movement there
Perhaps I was not thinking coherently
In this state I was careless
Their faces showed consternation
I was confused, so I smiled

The color drained out of the treetops
It was like looking up at the emerging stats
But who was counting
For a long while she didn’t say anything
I don’t know what’s wrong with me
He foresaw every disaster so no was on his lips
Listen he said, speaking tot the sky
The spilled paint of stars
Softened his voice

I won’t give anyone another chance
It’s been a long dance with death
I realized that I’m possibly quite mad. 
I know he is.
The world is full of people 
separated from themselves by families
What was her favorite song., 
the name of the lover she took to the grave
I never adopt a person who doesn’t have 

In the case of numbers
It allowed me a substitution
The trouble with Mike was
We had become middle class
But our dog had not
They turned towards us as if praying
She believed he betrayed mongrel origins

We were all, in all places
A picture of Brazilia, 
a white mansion shining in the jungle
The music is powerful, blessed
In this fine white afternoon
Paying no attention\to our own little brick utopia
Sort & discard
The heavy-footed building
A lazy reach & sigh
These are the papers I need
It begins to thin in the air at dusk
The one, a poet, the other an action.

1o/15/2006

AT THE COUNTY FAIR


AT THE COUNTY FAIR
—for Sharon Doubiago

The carnival straddled a limnal boundary 
between civilization & endless fields of corn. 
A miracle in the bright dust and mirrored lake
deep summer bloomed in cotton candy colors.
For a moment she was screaming,
& laughing against a bright sky
as the Fairest Wheel lifted her
weightless against the burden
of her father’s darkness.

In a constant elegy of ascent & death,
the Fairest Wheel dizzied them up to the stars,
& plunged them in o the dwarfed laps of broken families.
For a moment, she forgot she lived 
the enchanted sleep of Snow White 
where in dreams she rode a carousel pony. 
Between her clenched teeth, not a rose, 
but a blanket emitted a high-pitched sound
as a bright bloom escaped from her gown.

As she loosened herself from the horizon, 
she was forever tumbling against a silken sky.
Her blonde hair, a temporary sun
eclipsed & eclipsing the retextured sunlight.

For a moment she forgot what she was
becoming, a black dahlia.
Dust & parched earth. You could taste it 
in the air, acrid like carbolic soap & sweat.
Soon the rains would come. 

—Maureen Hurley
Walker Creek Ranch, 10/15.2006

Friday, October 13, 2006

Worthless

Worthless, less than, less loss. Loeser. Mary, the teacher, was married to a childhood neighbor. How many degrees of strangeness is that to be in her class in Oakland, where I let slip some geographical minutia. She startled like a deer caught in the headlights (we used to turn off the lights so the deer could cross the road… We grew fond of driving blind on moonlit nights.) She said Keith was my ex husband. I didn't ask how long the X negated the husband part, but I could see there was a fair amount of angst involved. I could tell she thought him worthless. Truth be known Keith was younger than me, and also a little weird. Apparently that turned into a whole lotta weird. Andrea, his genius sister is in a loony bin, and I think, what a colossal waste. What's the use of being a genius if there's no channel for it? What good are numbers to a physicist whose brain is biochemically addled? I know about that kind of life—we come from a long line of addlepated dysfunctional geniuses, and idiots to balance out the equation. Then, there's a rather large group of us with various real and imagined ailments so as to make several relatives hovering dangerously close to the worthless camp. Poor things, succumb to their worst nightmares – as if it was something that could be helped. Call it alcoholism, drug abuse, or being bipolar— the end result is a life rendered worthless because of the purgatorial anguish harbored within the mind. The night before last, I dreamt a nun was flyfishing off a skyscraper. I stood behind her, wondering what the catch of the day was. I opened my eyes wide, but  when I wasn't looking, small white lice had nestled in my eyelashes, obstructing the view.

Saturday, September 9, 2006

CPITS 2006, AT THE COUNTY FAIR

REGENERATIVE WRITING —with Tobey Kaplan


AT THE COUNTY FAIR
—for Sharon Doubiago

The carnival straddled a limnal boundary
between civilization & endless fields of corn.
A miracle in the bright dust and mirrored lake
deep summer bloomed in cotton candy colors.
For a moment she was screaming,
& laughing against a bright sky
as the Fairest Wheel lifted her
weightless against the burden
of her father’s darkness.

In a constant elegy of ascent & death,
the Fairest Wheel dizzied them up to the stars,
& plunged them in o the dwarfed laps of broken families.
For a moment, she forgot she lived
the enchanted sleep of Snow White
where in dreams she rode a carousel pony.
Between her clenched teeth, not a rose,
but a blanket emitted a high-pitched sound
as a bright bloom escaped from her gown.

As she loosened herself from the horizon,
she was forever tumbling against a silken sky.
Her blonde hair, a temporary sun
eclipsed & eclipsing the retextured sunlight.

For a moment she forgot what she was
becoming, a black dahlia.
Dust & parched earth. You could taste it
in the air, acrid like carbolic soap & sweat.
Soon the rains would come.

—Maureen Hurley
Walker Creek Ranch, 10/15.2006

MAUREEN HURLEY who grew up in the wilds of West Marin, a watershed away from Walker Creek, was Area Coordinator for Sonoma County for a decade, at present, she’s learning her urban skills in on the shores of Lake Merrit in Oakland. Published in the 2006 CPITS statewide anthology


GENERATIVE WRITING
From Thoreau, TC Boyle. Oates, Wright, Merrill, etc.

We were observing
Replacing the old style cells
In which a window
Measuring 6 x 8 feet
More movement there
Perhaps I was not thinking coherently
In this state I was careless
Their faces showed consternation
I was confused, so I smiled

The color drained out of the treetops
It was like looking up at the emerging stats
But who was counting
For a long while she didn’t say anything
I don’t know what’s wrong with me
He foresaw every disaster so no was on his lips
Listen he said, speaking tot the sky
The spilled paint of stars
Softened his voice

I won’t give anyone another chance
It’s been a long dance with death
I realized that I’m possibly quite mad.
I know he is.
The world is full of people
separated from themselves by families
What was her favorite song.,
the name of the lover she took to the grave
I never adopt a person who doesn’t have

In the case of numbers
It allowed me a substitution
The trouble with Mike was
We had become middle class
But our dog had not
They turned towards us as if praying
She believed he betrayed mongrel origins

We were all, in all places
A picture of Brazilia,
a white mansion shining in the jungle
The music is powerful, blessed
In this fine white afternoon
Paying no attention\to our own little brick utopia
Sort & discard
The heavy-footed building
A lazy reach & sigh
These are the papers I need
It begins to thin in the air at dusk
The one, a poet, the other an action.



PERSONA WORKSHOP
MARGINALIA After Jarrell

I had started to walk down the path
These are the roads you find yourself traveling
Homesick for anything, she asked me in her windswept voice
Occasions for the grief that left me seething at the sea
She heard a lot of it when she came home from the hospital
Help me! The pain in her bones paralyzed me
So I wrote these words in the margins

Friday, August 25, 2006

One

One, a vice of one? One needs a virtuosity of vices … A symphony… Virtue /vice – reminds me too much of biblical leanings. One is the loneliest number one… Oh, piss off ear candy! Get over it. Everybody's happy writing from the attribute of virtue/ vice—except me. I can't get to the next level. Begin again. Now, I'm caught up in word puns and silly rhymes, and God forbid: pop songs  (number one)– partially because I'm so stressed. One. To contemplate. I like one, I like its aloneness, the way it stands like a sacred stone. An "I am." I like the color and the sound of it – and synesthesia strikes again. One is silver-white, and casts a pale shadow of glacial ice, it rings like a silver bell, or like that melodic crash of ice crystals. The queen of Narnia is a one. Cate Blanchett is an ice maiden, cruel, ruthless, and alone in her sleigh. Always winter. I yawn, my ears pop, finally after several days of pain. I can hear. One-eared, I was. No dulcet duet of sound. Singing in pitch was problematic when sound was a singular one. I had to rely on memory. Now I can hear every single thing. The sound of paper rustling, like an avalanche, the rough scratching of pens in unison, a scratch of pens, one in unison. One, I am one.

Thursday, April 13, 2006

Arthur Boericke Obituary

From the Independent Journal

Arthur Boericke was an original and daring thinker and person. He was an advocate for unorthodox creativity in architecture -- elliptically bringing both away and towards the mainstream. He published several seminal books including 'Handmade Houses' -- a classic. He also was involved in the formation of the Farralones Institute, and was a supporter and adviser to Sim Van Der Ryn. He was born August 27th,1927 to Arthur and Edith Boericke, owners of Boericke and Runyon Pharmaceuticals. Arthur's grandfather was William Boericke, MD, author of the 'Materia Medica' which remains the primary reference for all things homeopathic. Arthur is survived -- and loved -- by many, many of us. We will celebrate him on Saturday, April 22nd, 2006 at 1:00 p.m. Call Sarah Howard for information about the Celebration 415-663-9778.

Published in Marin Independent Journal from Apr. 13 to Apr. 16, 2006I didn't hear of this until much later, and am sorry I missed it. This is a reference stub, something I need to get back to later.

Handmade Houses: A Guide to the Woodbutcher's Art, Arthur Boericke and Barry Shapiro (1973, Scrimshaw Press, A & W Publishers). I used to go on driving expeditions with Arthur as he was writing the book, in Marin, Sonoma, and Mendocino. We both had a red Volvo panel van.

Friday, April 7, 2006

Visible Spectrum


"Go deeper," he said. As if I needed prompting. All that azure and violet converging on ultra. I needed no encouragement. I opened a slender door that had no lintel, that had no frame. I had my hand on the visible spectrum, but on the cosmic side, where indigo crossed thresholds with ultraviolet, was where I was drawn to—luminal boundaries between worlds. Both the seen and the unseen, I was betwixt and between. Hovering towards the shade as in capital "S." Those ghostly apparitions who survive on the horizon. Not on the other side of the spectrum, near infrared.  Too hot. To me that was Hades, that was hell. Interesting that hell itself was either hot or cold depending upon your locale and ancestry. There was no hell in the Otherworld, merely the fourth dimension. Alternate reality was a world where time either ceased to exist, or hadn't yet been born. But the monks took care of that discrepancy, suggesting that time existed there too, only it passed more slowly, otherwise no one would ever get around to being born, let alone, conceived in the missionary position, or otherwise. We won't mention that their parents would never, ever meet up, because they too would have considerable trouble getting around to orchestrating their own conception, until we were all traveling backwards through time at such a tremendous rate that the Big Bang imploded into the period at the end of the sentence. And then, where would we be, then?

Saturday, April 1, 2006

Arts Education Alliance professional development workshop in Santa Rosa


Arts Council of Sonoma County 
ARTS Education Alliance

ARTS Integration:
Bringing Creativity to the Classroom

A SPECIAL WORKSHOP FOR SONOMA COUNTY TEACHERS
Saturday, April 1, 2006 – Wells Fargo Center for the Arts

The Arts Education Alliance is proud to bring you this dynamic professional development workshop.  In 2003, the Arts Council of Sonoma County formed a hardworking collaborative group, Arts Education Alliance.  Through this strong collaboration of individuals and organizations, the key goals of this group are to:
·    Communicate and disseminate arts education information throughout Sonoma County
·    Provide Professional Development opportunities as a way to keep art in education
·    Encourage creative partnerships and collaboration between local arts organizations, schools and teachers

Arts education is essential to the vitality if our community and the future of Sonoma County’s quality of life.  Anchoring a student’s learning with arts education will help motivate students in all areas of academics and contribute to their life skills.  Through professional development events and our Arts in Education a Resource Guide for Sonoma County we are supporting our Sonoma County educators!

On this CD you will find lesson plans for all three of today’s artist led professional development breakout sessions.

Thank you for participating!


I was one of three featured workshop leaders for this event. Maybe I'll find the publicity for it. This is all I have. But they made a CD too. The lesson plan I developed for teachers is

Friday, March 17, 2006

Divine Ratio


In a room where it is forever 4:44 in frozen time, we teach each other in four-minute lessons. Not five. In that we are congruent, we measure analogue time in digital increments, but it interferes with the metaphor of clock and moon. Or take five. The metaphor hasn't yet caught up with technology. We measure triangles, we invoke Pythagoras, and integers. We decode rational numbers using analogy. We question the golden ratio, calling it the Golden Mean. Take St. Patrick's Confessio, it was a secret word puzzle to unfold, invoking the divine ratio.

Wednesday, March 1, 2006

2006 CROSSROADS: Irish-American Festival




Calendar of Events
Wednesday - March 1st, 7:30-10 pm
An Evening of Resistance Music to Commemorate the 1981 Irish Hunger Strike
March 1, 2006 marks the 25th Anniversary of the beginning of the hunger strike that was a turning point in the struggle for Irish freedom and equality. Join us as local musicians honor
the hunger strikers’ memory with a rich and moving tribute to their struggle.
Performing Musicians:
Pat Hamilton; Ben Hunter; Tony
McMahon and Liam Tiernan of the legendary group, Barleycorn
March 1, 2006 marks the 25th Anniversary of the beginning of the hunger strike that was a turning point in the struggle for Irish freedom and equality. Join us as local musicians honor the hunger strikers’ memory with a rich and moving tribute to their struggle.
Moderated by Hillary Flynn, Crossroads Community Program Director
Location: New College of California, 766 Valencia @ 18th Street, San Francisco
Location: The Liberties Irish Bar & Restaurant, 998 Guerrero Street @23rd Street, San Francisco

Thursday - March 2nd, 8:00 pm
An Evening of music with Karen Casey and Flook (co-produced by the United Irish Cultural Center and The Fresh Air Festival)
Tickets: $20. Purchase at: www.ticketweb.com
Location: United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue @ Sloat, San Francisco

Friday - March 3rd, 7:30 pm
The Irish-American Memoir: A conversation and reading with Irish- American memoir writers.
Maura Conlon-McIvor, She's All Eyes: Memoirs of an Irish-American Daughter
Bridget Connolly, Forgetting Ireland: Uncovering a Family's Secret History
Maureen Murdock, Unreliable Truth: On Memoir and Memory
Maureen Waters, Crossing Highbridge: A Memoir of Irish America
events surrounding the Irish Hunger Strike of 1981 in Long Kesh prison and its powerful impact on the politics of Ireland and America down to the present
Moderated by Hillary Flynn, Crossroads Community Program Director
Location: New College of California, 766 Valencia @ 18th Street, San Francisco

Sunday - March 5th, 7:30 pm
Poetry Night
Jack Foley, Letters/Lights—Words for Adelle, Gershwin, Adrift, Exiles, and with Ivan Argüelles, New Poetry from California: Dead/Requiem; Host, Cover to Cover on KPFA
Katherine Hastings, Director, WordTemple Poetry Series at Copperfield Books in Santa Rosa, and a widely published poet in many journals and anthologies.
Maureen Hurley, Falling to Sea Level, Klarlight; Cleveland Elementary School Arts Instructor
Chad Sweeney, Salt Plain and Other Stories, Co-Editor, Parthenon West Review; San Francisco WritersCorps teacher
Moderated by Liz Burke, Adjunct Faculty, John F. Kennedy University
Location: Bird & Beckett Books, 2788 Diamond Street @ Chenery, San Francisco

Tuesday - March 7th, 7:30 pm
25th Anniversary of The 1981 Hunger Strike: A Lasting Impact
Join us for a conversation about the day.

Tuesday - March 7th, 7:30 pm
College of California Irish Studies
25th Anniversary of The 1981 Hunger Strike: A Lasting Impact
Join us for a conversation about the
Michael Corrigan, Confessions of a Shanty Irishman
Daniel Cassidy, Co-Director, New
events surrounding the Irish Hunger Strike of 1981 in Long Kesh prison and its powerful impact on the politics of Ireland and America down to the present day.
John Fogarty, Western Regional Representative, Irish American Unity Conference
Hon. Tom Hayden, Author, Activist, Educator
Bobby Lavery, Elected Representative to the Belfast City Council for 11 years for Sinn Féin
Bill Simmons, International Indian Treaty Council
Nadya Connolly Williams, Global Exchange Study Tour Coordinator for the north of Ireland, and other destinations
Moderated by: Daniel Cassidy, Co- Director, New College of California, Irish Studies Program
Location: United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue @ Sloat, San Francisco

Wednesday - March 8th, 7:30 pm
A Celebration of the Life of Peter Tamony
A night celebrating the life and work of a forgotten Irish-American folklorist from the old Mission District of San Francisco.
Karen Ellis, author, teacher and publisher of print and online media. Her work can be found at: Educational CyberPlayGround
The public is invited to join in a conversation about Irish-Americans in social justice movements.
Ellen Barry, prison rights activist,
Michael Corrigan, Confessions of a Shanty Irishman
Daniel Cassidy, Co-Director, New College of California Irish Studies Program
Location: New College of California, 7:30–10 pm, 766 Valencia @ 18th Street, San Francisco

Thursday - March 9th, 7:30 pm
The Irish in the Sunset District
An exploration of the history of the Irish- American community of the Sunset District of San Francisco, featuring a variety of panelists including Anne Carew, Pat Maguire, Diarmuid Philpott, Bob Twomey, and Jeffrey M. Burns, the Archivist for the Archdiocese of San Francisco, as well as other members of the neighborhood.
Moderated by Margaret McPeake, Co- Director, New College of California Irish Studies Program.
Location: United Irish Cultural Center, 2700 45th Avenue @ Sloat, San Francisco

Saturday - March 11th
1:30–2:00 pm
Tipsy House, Traditional Music Group
2:00–4:00 pm
Irish-Americans in Social Justice Movements
lawyer, organizer and 2005 Nobel Peace
2:00–4:00 pm
The public is invited to join in a conversation about Irish-Americans in social justice movements.
Ellen Barry, prison rights activist, lawyer, organizer and 2005 Nobel Peace Prize nominee
Kevin Fagan, Award-winning San Francisco Chronicle Journalist
Sister Maureen Hally, RSM, Educator, Activist, Warrior Crone.
Moderated by Hillary Flynn, Crossroads Community Program Director.
Location: San Francisco Public Library, Koret Auditorium, 100 Grove Street, San Francisco

2006 CROSSROADS: Irish-American Festival